Good discussions on the smoking correlation discussion, Danielle.

Comment 1

Good discussions on the smoking correlation discussion, Danielle.

OK, now just to brush up the kinds of correlation we have considered in this statistics course, consider this advertised case study:

A recent study of recently deceased people (population = 100) determined a strong positive correlation; the correlation established was between the age of the death of the deceased, and the length of the longest line on his or her palm.

From the abovementioned correlation, would you say that this provides support for a claim that a longer palm line necessarily predicts a longer life?

Anyone?

Comment 2

Good examples! Frankly, in many ways, some of the statistics I see thrown out there boggles my mind.

Case in point: it actually amazes me how, for instance, drug companies are able to find safe haven with this much of misleading information. I have always been curious to see if researchers ever challenge them in order to validate when they’ve generated the data. They should if they have concerns for the well-being and general health of the public. In fact, I think some stepping-in should come from the government as well.

In this context, I know the FDA plays a great part; however, I also feel that the advertisements provided should be as accurate as possible. Usually, they’re only looking for monetary gain.

What do you think?

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